A note from the desk of The Stanford Flipside: We are expanding our horizons into some real reporting, starting with this bad boy right here. Since our friends over at The Daily have made the leap on over to satire, we decided to try our hand at giving you the cold, hard facts. xoxo.

On 3:00 p.m. of Thursday, November 21, thirty to forty students gathered in front of Building 10. The students booed in front of the building for eight to thirteen minutes before dispersing. There were also some thumbs downs, shouted messages, and signs that said different things.

Jackson Miller ’20, when asked why he was booing, explained that “there’s so many reasons.”

Christina Nikitin ’21, when asked about how it felt to boo, said that “this event embodies the sheer, insane injustice that goes on here. There are just too many reasons to count. Booing is the collective sound of the student body’s discontent, in the hopes that the administration will listen. Resistance is often held back by a lack of narrative behind it, which is why these verbal demands and signs are crucial; by being here all together, we’re expressing solidarity with each other against this injustice.”

Ash Huang ’20 expressed feeling “pretty good, pretty solid, especially when we did [the booing] all together.”

Though this event happened weeks ago, The Stanford Flipside has been waiting to publish the report for any direct action to result from this display. We have since given up. As of press time, the administration had not responded to the booing.

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